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Visiting Refugees in Moncton: MAGMA and Canadians for Syria

While passing through Moncton, I had the opportunity to visit the Multicultural Association of the Greater Moncton Area, or MAGMA, an organization that helps to welcome refugees and support them during their transition to life in Canada. MAGMA serves as a leader in the effort to address the Syrian refugee crisis, not only in Moncton and New Brunswick, but in Canada as a whole. It was amazing to be able to take some time to get off of my bike and tour their office, as well as to meet the refugees that are benefiting from their work. 

What services does MAGMA provide to refugees? 

For many refugees, their interaction with MAGMA begins right when they land in Canada. MAGMA will often take on the responsibility of taking the refugee or refugee family from the airport to their new home, and will help refugees adjust to life in Canada. This support comes in a variety of forms, such as free daycare for the children of refugee families, English language lessons for all skill levels, and assistance in finding stable employment. 

I was on a tour of MAGMA with Justin Ryan, their Public Relations Officer, and I think he could tell by the look on my face when he mentioned "adorable preschool kids" that we needed to start off with some cuteness. Visiting the daycare and playing with children of Syrian, Iraqi, Somalian, and Eritrean descent has to go down as a highlight of the trip: 

These children, who were either born in Canada or who came to Canada from the Middle East or Africa at a very young age, are able to live, learn and grow in a safe environment. However, many children of the same age are not lucky enough to have been resettled, and consequently face a very different daily life. 

Children living in areas of war are under a constant threat of violence. For those who are born into a conflict, such as the youngest son of the Beshmaf family - the family that Canadians for Syria is sponsoring - the reality of war is all they have ever known. The effect that war has on children is incredibly multifaceted - we are all aware of the physical dangers posed to children and their families, yet this is only the beginning of what refugee children have to face. 

What follows war is just as debilitating. Many refugees suffer from mental illnesses such as depression and PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder), conditions that often only surface once they have resettled. For both children and adults, these issues fundamentally limit their ability to rebuild their lives.

For instance, one of the Syrian refugees in Toronto that I spoke to saw her family brutally murdered in front of her. A year after arriving in Canada, she didn't have a stable job - not because she didn't want one, but because she could not, both mentally and emotionally, work at this point. Cases like this must be understood and empathized with. The reality of mental illness among refugees means that some are able to arrive in Canada and begin to work in a matter of weeks, while others, like the woman in Toronto that I spoke to, need time to heal wounds that are impossible to see. 

Click here to read a great article by the National Observer on the reality of addressing mental health among refugees in Canada, and click here to read an incredibly revealing story by the New Yorker on life as a young refugee. 

What do English language lessons for refugees look like? Do most refugees come to Canada with a certain level of English comprehension? 

I got the chance to sit in on a beginner English lesson, taught by Tamela and Wasfi of MAGMA. The class was incredibly diverse, with refugees from Syria, Somalia and Eritrea composing the majority of the students. Refugees arrive in Canada with incredible variance in their English skills - some were able to learn basic English or French in a past job, while most are in need of substantial support from organizations like MAGMA. 

The linguistic difference between Arabic and English is immense, but many of the refugees have begun to quickly pick up the language. I was able to speak to the class, both directly in English and with the help of my Arabic translator Houda.

Their stories were incredibly diverse - back home, they worked as carpenters, teachers, construction workers, and homemakers. Many have been in Canada for only a few months, but love the country and the city of Moncton especially. Most are also the mothers and fathers of the children I had just visited - many of these new Canadians would not be able to attend English lessons without the free daycare that MAGMA provides.

Spending the morning at MAGMA was amazing, and it was a great reminder of the reason behind this ride. After getting the support of the MAGMA team and the refugees at the centre, I went for a quick interview with the Times and Transcript - you can check out the story they wrote here: 

Eventually though, I had to say goodbye to Moncton and get back on the road. Thank you to everyone at MAGMA for helping me organize the visit, and for putting together such a great day - please check out their website here, as well as their Facebook page here. 

Days 23 and 24: Running out of Canada to Bike Across

Argentia, NL to Holyrood, to Cape Spear  

Distance: 161 KM biked

Total KM Biked: 2612 KM in 24 days 

The amazing views made up for the cold temperature - throughout the day, it became more and more clear that Newfoundland was becoming my favourite province of the entire trip. The fjords, winding roads and Scandinavian-esque landscapes made Newfoundland stand out, and today actually ended up being one of my favourite days of the ride. 

Quick side note: I want to give a big thank you to Subway for their support during the ride - free Chicken Teriyaki subs are actually what fueled most of this ride. Thank you so much for the free food (and free WiFi, of course). 

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The end of Canada isn't too far off now :)  

Made it to St. John's and the official end of the Trans Canada Trail - only 13 KM left to Cape Spear and the easternmost point of Canada. 

And just like that, 2612 KM down. Making it to the end of Canada was a really surreal feeling - I'd like to say that the distance flew by, but I really felt every KM of biking. I'll be putting up a summary blog post to go over some of the highlights of the trip, but wow, this was a crazy adventure. 

Thank you so much to everyone who supported me along the way, and to everyone who has donated - with over $21,000 raised so far for the Beshmaf family, I'm proud to say that we're well on our way to bringing a deserving family of Syrian refugees to Canada. 

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And while taking in the Atlantic at Cape Spear, I got a little surprise: 

We're done! I made it back to St. John's and celebrated over all-you-can-eat sushi (I definitely profited on the all-you-can-eat price by eating around a hundred pieces of sushi). I'll be posting the summary blog post in the next few days, but for now, thank you for following this blog throughout the ride - next stop, Toronto :) 

Days 20, 21, and 22: Three Great Days in Nova Scotia Down

Pictou, NS to Antigonish, to Whycocomagh, to North Sydney

Distance: 307 KM biked

Total KM Biked: 2451 KM in 22 days

This part of Canada definitely isn't designed for bikers. In general, you have one of two options: the Trans Canada Trail, which is the safest route, but is all gravel/dirt and isn't the most direct connection between my stops, and the Trans Canada Highway, which has the most car traffic but can get you from Point A to Point B the fastest. 

I used the highway for most of today, but there were areas (see below) where there was no shoulder on the road and I had to ride on the gravel section beside the highway. Riding beside cars and trucks going 120 KM/H is definitely not fun, but again, the highway does get you across the Maritimes faster than anything else. 

After reaching Antigonish, I kept going through Nova Scotia towards Cape Breton, ready for the scenic views of the Cabot Trail :) 

The rain kept falling all day, and I got caught in a really bad downpour in the middle of Cape Breton. Riding with soaked shoes and clothes definitely won't be on the highlight reel of the ride, but when the rain stopped, it did make for some awesome riding: 

Made it to Whycocomagh - thank you to the Bear on the Lake Guesthouse for hosting me! I thought that I would have time to ride into town to grab food, but with the sun going down quickly, I decided to eat what I was carrying with me. So, dinner was five pieces of wet bread with peanut butter - definitely not fancy, but good enough. 

And finally, Day 22: heading from inland Cape Breton to North Sydney to catch the ferry to Newfoundland. 

There also happened to be a power outage, which meant no running water - had to improvise to stay hydrated. Luckily I ran into a pipe along the road that had natural spring water, and was 99.99% sure that it was safe to drink. Maybe 99.98% sure. 

It was definitely a nice break to be moving without having to pedal. The 16 hour ferry ride took me from North Sydney, NS to Argentia, NL, meaning that it was an overnight trip. I didn't get a cabin (in order to save a bit of money) and found a quiet place in the ferry's movie theater to sleep - honestly, after biking all day, sleeping in that chair felt amazing. 

Days 17, 18 and 19: Bear and Bike Troubles

Moncton to Port Elgin, to Charlottetown, PEI, to Pictou, NS

Distance: 273 KM biked

Total KM Biked: 2144 KM in 19 days

After visiting The Multicultural Association of the Greater Moncton Area (MAGMA) and speaking with Syrian, Eritrean, and refugees of other nationalities, I hopped back onto the road to head out of Moncton. 

Thank you to the C'mon Inn Hostel for hosting me in Moncton!

The "Running into a Bear and Having Your Bike Breakdown" Story

Everything was going great with the ride, and my only concern was time - because of the morning meetings, I was starting my ride pretty late. 

The second half of today's ride was all on the Trans Canada Trail, along a section of the trail that was 40 KM long and completely isolated - no towns, no homes, no roads to get off at. Basically, it was the worst spot so far for something to go wrong. 

So guess what happened. 

Now, the bear wasn't a big deal - after it wouldn't get off the trail, I pulled out my whistle and started being really loud as I moved towards it. When I was about 25 metres away, the bear came out onto the middle of the path to look at me with its ears perked, but as I biked closer it got the message and moved off of the path, allowing me to bike past. 

Challenge one, done. But the real challenge came about 200 metres after the bear. The trail got really rocky, and with 15 KM to go to my next stop, I got a flat tire. Now, that's not a big deal - flats are common, and easy to fix. 

I flipped over my bike and got to unscrewing the nuts on the back wheel that hold it to the bike. Unscrewing the left one was no problem. The right one, however, was extremely tight. I realized that, because I had taken my bike to a mechanic the day before, they had tightened these nuts using their heavy duty equipment, meaning that I couldn't take off that nut using my portable set. 

This was a much bigger problem than a bear. It was now 9 PM, getting dark, and I was still 15 KM from my destination. With no other choice and with a ridiculous number of mosquitoes attacking me, I put all of my equipment back on the bike and started to run down the trail, dragging my bike along with me. 

This was brutal. In the forest, it got dark fast, and I had to use a headlamp to see where I was going. After 2 KM of running, I heard a crashing noise right beside me, and looked over to see a moose standing 5 metres away from me, just staring. I kept running and running, especially since if I stopped to catch my breath, the cloud of mosquitoes that was chasing me would catch up. 

After being able to run about 7 KM in 45 minutes with my bike and all of my gear, I knew that I was in a bad place. I was going to get to my next stop around midnight at this point, assuming that I didn't run into any other trouble on the way. I had called Linda, my host in Port Elgin, to tell her that I would be really late, but because the trail is so isolated, there wasn't much she could do to help. 

A bit after 10 PM, I saw light appear on the trail. In the distance, I thought it might be a house or shed, but the lights kept growing larger. I realized that it was a car, and I don't think I've ever been happier to see a car in my life. It turns out that Linda had found someone in town with a Jeep that could handle the rough terrain of the trail, and so we threw my bike into the back of the Jeep, and with me laying on top of the bike, we started driving towards town. Even with the Jeep, it still took almost 45 minutes to get across the trail, but just after 11 PM, I managed to make it to Port Elgin and collapse on a bed. 

And just like that, onto Day 18. Thank you so much to Linda for hosting me in Port Elgin! 

Surprise, surprise - turns out that inland PEI is really hilly :( 

Carb recovery meal: 

And finally, Day 19! Today was biking really fast to catch the ferry to Nova Scotia, so compared to my Bear-and-Bike day, it wasn't exciting at all - just the way I like it. 

4 provinces down, 2 more to go. Sorry for the shorter blog posts, but I just have to keep biking - almost done!

Days 15 and 16: Please Stop Raining, Please

Fredericton to Jemseg, to Moncton

Distance: 192 KM biked 

Time Spent Biking: 14 hours over 2 days 

Total KM Biked: 1871 KM in 16 days

Wise words to live by. 

The rain was really bad today - I just wanted to get to my next stop, but it was ridiculously cold and miserable to bike in the rain. When the rain and wind got so bad that it forced me to stop, I lucked out: 

Yikes, Day 15 would have been a lot better with some sun. Spent Canada Day drying my clothes (and failing), and hit the road again the next day.

Today was just lonely, lonely riding. The final distance ended up being just over 130 KM on country side roads, and something like 5 cars passed me per hour, max. 

Never thought I would miss cars :( 

But the open road did allow for me to make great time, and I was bombing down the road while also trying to outrun horseflies. 

The sun came out in full force - with no shade, riding became crazy exhausting:

After a full day of riding, I made it to Moncton, more than ready for a day without biking - really excited to visit MAGMA, the local refugee agency. 

This was a fast update - the blog for the Moncton section of the ride will be MUCH more exciting, believe me. Should be uploading those blog posts in the next few days! 

As always, please consider donating to help us sponsor the Beshmaf family, a family of five Syrian refugees here. 

Days 12, 13 and 14: The Ups and Downs of New Brunswick

Cabano, QC to Saint-Leonard, NB, to Florenceville-Bristol, to Fredericton

Distance: 365 KM biked 

Time Spent Biking: 24 hours over 3 days

Total KM Biked: 1679 KM in 14 days

The hilly theme just kept on going today: you really don't spend too much time biking on flat land in this part of Canada :( 

Victor's Top 3 Tips to Forget That You're Climbing a Hill

1) Delusional Thinking: "I'm sure that because this is the 20th hill I've had to climb today, this will be the last one. I can't wait to finish climbing this hill and see that there definitely isn't another hill waiting for me on the other side!" 

2) Good Music: Here are my favourites for today:

The Killers - All These Things That I've Done 

Dan Auerbach - King Of A One Horse Town

Arctic Monkeys - Fluorescent Adolescent

To keep things PG I'll keep the rap music to myself :) 

3) Get Existential: "What is a hill? Why am I climbing this hill? Why doesn't anyone invent a way to climb hills without this much effort? Oh they have that? Why am I not using that? Oh right, because I'm crazy. Got it." 

Ran out of flavours of Gatorade to try - moving on to protein shakes. 

Ran out of flavours of Gatorade to try - moving on to protein shakes. 

Spent a lot more time on the official Trans Canada Trail today. It actually stretches across all of Canada, check it out here: thegreattrail.ca

Spent a lot more time on the official Trans Canada Trail today. It actually stretches across all of Canada, check it out here: thegreattrail.ca

The Trail, Stage 1: Great Views, Easy Riding

Stage 2: Wait what happened, I'll take anything flat, please, please come back flat gravel. 

Stage 3: Never leave me flat gravel paths, you complete me. 

Ran into Roy on the road - he's biking from Victoria, BC to St. John's! We biked together to Florenceville and grabbed dinner, over which we exchanged a bunch of stories (of pain, of course). Fun fact: apparently the roughest part of a Trans Canada ride is in Northern Ontario (once you cross over from Manitoba). 

Day 14: Fredericton, here I come! 

It's tough to complain about anything when you're biking beside a view like this - amazing part of the Trans Canada Trail.

Spoiler Alert: It was the best Chicken Teriyaki sandwich of my life. Subway, you made all of my wildest dreams come true. 

Three tough days of hills down! I reached Fredericton and had an amazing home-cooked meal waiting for me, courtesy of Lorraine Neill.

Thank you so much Ms. Neill, for the dinner, for the (basically unlimited) fresh apple pie, for a warm bed, and for all of those snacks for the road :) 

14 days down, almost 1700 KM done, and $13,000 raised - the adventure goes on. If you haven't yet, please donate to help sponsor the Beshmaf family here. 

Days 9, 10 and 11: You Don't Appreciate Flat Land Until It's Gone

Quebec City to La Pocatière, to Rivière-du-Loup, to Cabano

Distance: 281 KM biked 

Time Spent Biking: 19 hours over 3 days

Total KM Biked: 1314 KM in 11 days

Just before starting the ride today, I had a great interview with the Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph. This entire project has been a challenge, but it's amazing to be able to say that we've brought together 120 people to help sponsor the Beshmaf family already. We'll post a link to the QCT interview once it goes up!

Quebec seems to have been designed for bikers - I'm going to really miss these paths

Quebec seems to have been designed for bikers - I'm going to really miss these paths

After getting used to biking with so much weight, my bike feels way too light when I take the bags off 

After getting used to biking with so much weight, my bike feels way too light when I take the bags off 

I'm finally getting used to the rhythm of this - wake up, pack up, get on the bike, pedal pedal pedal, eat eat eat, and repeat. The most exhausting part has to be getting to my location and still having so much to catch up on with this project, but losing sleep for this trip isn't bad at all. 

Done with Day 9, onto Day 10!

The roads are getting much more empty and lonely, making the distance go by more slowly 

The roads are getting much more empty and lonely, making the distance go by more slowly 

Today was surprisingly tough - the open landscape exposed me to a pretty bad headwind that slowed me down. I also felt that my bike was slowly breaking down, and I had to make some repairs before I reached Rivière-du-Loup. All in all though, definitely one of my better days so far in the ride!

Last but not least, Day 11:

Someone finally makes a stand against the horses - I guess the fact that I haven't seen a horse yet means it's working?

Someone finally makes a stand against the horses - I guess the fact that I haven't seen a horse yet means it's working?

Found a lake near the peak of the climb to relax by (and eat by)

Found a lake near the peak of the climb to relax by (and eat by)

And there goes Day 11! I'm officially in New Brunswick, and the next few days will be when I have to get through some more hills and mountains. My legs can't wait. 

We're almost at $13,000 in donations! We're hoping to reach $30,000 by the end of July, and it would be amazing to get your donation if you haven't already contributed towards sponsoring the Beshmaf family. We're about to finalize some sponsorship details with the family, and if you'd like to stay informed on the entire sponsorship process, please donate any amount and we'll keep you updated. 

Donate here!

Lots of love from the road, 

Victor

Day 8: A Stranger Buys Me Dinner

Trois-Rivières to Quebec City

Distance: 134 KM biked 

Time Spent Biking: 8 hours

Total KM Biked: 1033 KM in 8 days

First off, thank you so much Francois for taking me in for two nights. It was amazing to come to Trois-Rivières after a long day of biking and find a steak dinner waiting for me - definitely got spoiled here. Thank you for your kindness and support for the cause!

It was actually really convenient that I got rained out yesterday - aside from having an interview with SANA Trois-Rivières and catching up on work, I managed to check out the town in the moments that it wasn't raining (I walked around though, a bit too traumatized to use my bike.) 

Quebec really does have some beautiful churches, reminds me of Europe. 

Quebec really does have some beautiful churches, reminds me of Europe. 

Romantic candlelit dinner at an Italian restaurant with my laptop bag - I really treasure these moments. 

Romantic candlelit dinner at an Italian restaurant with my laptop bag - I really treasure these moments. 

All good things must come to an end though, and with more bad weather looming, I set off for Quebec City. 

Still biking along the St. Lawrence!

Still biking along the St. Lawrence!

So many flavours, so little time. Also, eating a box of granola bars for lunch should be judged as an act of necessity. Please. 

So many flavours, so little time. Also, eating a box of granola bars for lunch should be judged as an act of necessity. Please. 

Today was another crazy long day, but I definitely feel my body getting used to it - it's really only my hands right now that are a problem. 

The "A Stranger Bought Me Dinner" Story

I pulled into Quebec City, and while I waited for my host to come home, I decided to grab dinner. As I was locking up my bike, another cyclist came by and locked his bike, and noticing that I was carrying so much equipment (and that I looked dead), he asked me what I was doing. 

As soon as I explained the project, he got really excited and introduced himself. Steve is a medical student at Université Laval, and we got to talking about the Ride and social good in general. Long story short, he actually ended up paying for my dinner (I tried to insist that I pay for myself), and we had a great conversation while I waited for my host.  

Thanks Steve for the kindness, and for later making a donation to the Beshmaf family. This is just another example of how amazingly kind Canadians can be, and I'm being very genuine when I say that things like this make me proud to be Canadian (hope that's not too cheesy). 

Please donate here if you haven't already! On to another day. 

Rained out in Trois-Rivières

With heavy rain starting in the morning and thunderstorms projected to carry on throughout the day, I was forced to stay in Trois-Rivières. That actually worked out for the best, as I had even more time to sit down and talk with Maude Fontaine. 

Maude works with SANA Trois-Rivières, a NGO which helps to welcome refugees to the community and ensure that their basic needs are met. I've put together some of the main points of the conversation: 

1) What are the largest barriers that Syrian refugees face in Trois-Rivières?

Trois-Rivières has been particularly welcoming of refugees - Maude mentioned that the city hosts the greatest number of refugees per capita of any city in Quebec. That being said, an enormous barrier is language, as even though some Syrian refugees may speak English, very few speak French. 

As expected, the majority of refugees head to urban centres such as Montreal, Trois-Rivières, and Quebec City, where a more multicultural make-up of the city creates a welcoming scene. However, certain more rural parts of Quebec, and indeed all of Canada, remain opposed to the government committing too many resources to Syrians and other refugees. Although this internal political debate is less intense in Canada when compared to other developed nations, we cannot pretend that it does not exist. 

Little by little however, refugees are being integrated into Canadian society. This integration should not be thought of as following a cookie cutter model - certain refugees are able to work very soon after their arrival in Canada, while others are limited by the physical and emotional trauma they underwent through the crisis. Integration means understanding that each refugee is a unique case, and has to be treated as such. 

2) Are we doing enough?

Canadians like Maude are doing incredible work to ensure that Syrians are able to receive support in Canada, but a large issue surrounds the lack of social focus on the Syrian refugee crisis. When comparing the attention given to the crisis in 2015 and the coverage Syrian refugees receive today, it is clear that Canadians have shifted their attention elsewhere. 

This has had disastrous effects on organizations meant to help refugees, as the Canadian government has imposed budget cuts that limit the ability of such organizations to truly support refugee families. Without public attention, this crisis very easily moves into the background of our minds, even though Syrians are in just as much need today as they were in 2015 or 2011. 

3) What additional resources do organizations like SANA need? 

Beyond financial resources, Canadian groups fighting to raise awareness of the Syrian refugee crisis need the support of average Canadians. Be this through volunteering at a refugee centre, helping to sponsor a family, or actively seeking opportunities to welcome refugees in their community, Canadians need to become aware of a simple fact: if they don't get involved, then the issue fades from the Canadian public's and government's attention. 

Syrian refugees are still in desperate situations and are in need of immediate aid. We cannot let ourselves fall into a cycle of caring for an issue only as long as news headlines carry it forward.


Please check out SANA at their Facebook page and website. A big thank you to Maude for taking the time to sit down with me, and for her support for Canadians for Syria - looking forward to collaborating soon! 

If you'd like to learn more about ways to get involved, check out this list of amazing organizations in Canada which are directly helping Syrian refugee families. If you'd like to help sponsor the Beshmaf family with us, please consider donating here - we'll make sure that your support of this family creates a personal link that will change the way you look at the Syrian refugee crisis. 

Day 7: So Long Montreal, Hello Trois-Rivières

Montreal to Trois-Rivières

Distance: 143 KM biked 

Time Spent Biking: 9 hours

Total KM Biked: 899 KM in 7 days

Definitely feel better rested after yesterday - I really pushed myself the first week, mostly to test myself and to really put as many KM behind me as possible. That being said, I'm going to have to smarten up and slow down, as I don't want to strain a muscle or injure myself in any other way. 

Thank you so much to Auberge Bishop in Montreal for hosting me! This was definitely one of the best hostels I've ever been in, and their unlimited morning bagels and coffee basically sent me to heaven. Please check them out if you're ever in Montreal - thanks again Auberge Bishop for your support! 

Thank you so much to Auberge Bishop in Montreal for hosting me! This was definitely one of the best hostels I've ever been in, and their unlimited morning bagels and coffee basically sent me to heaven. Please check them out if you're ever in Montreal - thanks again Auberge Bishop for your support! 

A Sponsorship Update

As you hopefully know by now, we're sponsoring the Beshmaf family, a family of five Syrian refugees with three young children. Check out our Facebook post introducing them here - if you'd like to receive more details on the family and be kept in the loop, please donate here! For privacy reasons, we won't be able to release certain details publicly, but donating will allow you to be included in the sponsorship group. 

I've also been receiving messages from Syrian refugees in the Middle East that have heard about the project. Both individual refugees and the parents of families are sending us emails and messages asking if we can in any way help to sponsor them, and it's really difficult to tell them that even though we want to help, there's only so much we can do.

Raising $30,000 to sponsor the Beshmaf family is already an immense challenge, but I hope that we can get enough support one day to be able to help even more refugees. 

I sometimes find myself biking on a wide open road just randomly singing a song, and then not realizing when I pass someone that I'm singing pretty loudly. Case in point, I was signing Hotel California when I saw a Quebecois milk farmer looking at me like I was crazy. Learned my lesson, I'll try to be more discrete moving forward.

I sometimes find myself biking on a wide open road just randomly singing a song, and then not realizing when I pass someone that I'm singing pretty loudly. Case in point, I was signing Hotel California when I saw a Quebecois milk farmer looking at me like I was crazy. Learned my lesson, I'll try to be more discrete moving forward.

The quest to try every flavour of Gatorade and every protein bar in Canada continues.

The quest to try every flavour of Gatorade and every protein bar in Canada continues.

Improvised a solution to my hand pain to absorb some of the vibration of the bike - definitely not a complete solution though.

Improvised a solution to my hand pain to absorb some of the vibration of the bike - definitely not a complete solution though.

Lonely roads in the middle of Quebec.

Lonely roads in the middle of Quebec.

Still biking along the St. Lawrence - biking makes you appreciate distances so much more, this river really is enormous. 

Still biking along the St. Lawrence - biking makes you appreciate distances so much more, this river really is enormous. 

And that's Day 7! Almost at the 1000 KM mark, and even though my body is definitely slowly breaking down, it's been an amazing adventure so far. If you haven't donated yet, please check out our Donate page here - 100% of your donation will go directly towards sponsoring the Beshmaf family!